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Full Data Controlled Web Based Feed Aggregator
48,99 € *
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Full Data Controlled Web Based Feed Aggregator ab 48.99 € als Taschenbuch: Open Source and Feed Syndication in Research Intelligence Gathering Information Sharing and Business Enterprise. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, English, International, Gebundene Ausgaben,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 22.10.2020
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The Zero Marginal Cost Society (eBook, ePUB)
7,99 € *
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In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism.Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now taking it to its death-the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that drives productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services in order to win over consumers and market share. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs are not counted.) While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring marginal costs to near zero, making goods and services priceless, nearly free, and abundant, and no longer subject to market forces.Now, a formidable new technology infrastructure-the Internet of things (IoT)-is emerging with the potential of pushing large segments of economic life to near zero marginal cost in the years ahead. Rifkin describes how the Communication Internet is converging with a nascent Energy Internet and Logistics Internet to create a new technology platform that connects everything and everyone. Billions of sensors are being attached to natural resources, production lines, the electricity grid, logistics networks, recycling flows, and implanted in homes, offices, stores, vehicles, and even human beings, feeding Big Data into an IoT global neural network. Prosumers can connect to the network and use Big Data, analytics, and algorithms to accelerate efficiency, dramatically increase productivity, and lower the marginal cost of producing and sharing a wide range of products and services to near zero, just like they now do with information goods. The plummeting of marginal costs is spawning a hybrid economy-part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons-with far reaching implications for society, according to Rifkin. Hundreds of millions of people are already transferring parts of their economic lives to the global Collaborative Commons. Prosumers are plugging into the fledgling IoT and making and sharing their own information, entertainment, green energy, and 3D-printed products at near zero marginal cost. They are also sharing cars, homes, clothes and other items via social media sites, rentals, redistribution clubs, and cooperatives at low or near zero marginal cost. Students are enrolling in free massive open online courses (MOOCs) that operate at near zero marginal cost. Social entrepreneurs are even bypassing the banking establishment and using crowdfunding to finance startup businesses as well as creating alternative currencies in the fledgling sharing economy. In this new world, social capital is as important as financial capital, access trumps ownership, sustainability supersedes consumerism, cooperation ousts competition, and "exchange value" in the capitalist marketplace is increasingly replaced by "sharable value" on the Collaborative Commons. Rifkin concludes that capitalism will remain with us, albeit in an increasingly streamlined role, primarily as an aggregator of network services and solutions, allowing it to flourish as a powerful niche player in the coming era. We are, however, says Rifkin, entering a world beyond markets where we are learning how to live together in an increasingly interdependent global Collaborative Commons.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 22.10.2020
Zum Angebot
The Zero Marginal Cost Society (eBook, ePUB)
7,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism.Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now taking it to its death-the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that drives productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services in order to win over consumers and market share. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs are not counted.) While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring marginal costs to near zero, making goods and services priceless, nearly free, and abundant, and no longer subject to market forces.Now, a formidable new technology infrastructure-the Internet of things (IoT)-is emerging with the potential of pushing large segments of economic life to near zero marginal cost in the years ahead. Rifkin describes how the Communication Internet is converging with a nascent Energy Internet and Logistics Internet to create a new technology platform that connects everything and everyone. Billions of sensors are being attached to natural resources, production lines, the electricity grid, logistics networks, recycling flows, and implanted in homes, offices, stores, vehicles, and even human beings, feeding Big Data into an IoT global neural network. Prosumers can connect to the network and use Big Data, analytics, and algorithms to accelerate efficiency, dramatically increase productivity, and lower the marginal cost of producing and sharing a wide range of products and services to near zero, just like they now do with information goods. The plummeting of marginal costs is spawning a hybrid economy-part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons-with far reaching implications for society, according to Rifkin. Hundreds of millions of people are already transferring parts of their economic lives to the global Collaborative Commons. Prosumers are plugging into the fledgling IoT and making and sharing their own information, entertainment, green energy, and 3D-printed products at near zero marginal cost. They are also sharing cars, homes, clothes and other items via social media sites, rentals, redistribution clubs, and cooperatives at low or near zero marginal cost. Students are enrolling in free massive open online courses (MOOCs) that operate at near zero marginal cost. Social entrepreneurs are even bypassing the banking establishment and using crowdfunding to finance startup businesses as well as creating alternative currencies in the fledgling sharing economy. In this new world, social capital is as important as financial capital, access trumps ownership, sustainability supersedes consumerism, cooperation ousts competition, and "exchange value" in the capitalist marketplace is increasingly replaced by "sharable value" on the Collaborative Commons. Rifkin concludes that capitalism will remain with us, albeit in an increasingly streamlined role, primarily as an aggregator of network services and solutions, allowing it to flourish as a powerful niche player in the coming era. We are, however, says Rifkin, entering a world beyond markets where we are learning how to live together in an increasingly interdependent global Collaborative Commons.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 22.10.2020
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Enterprise Integration Patterns
44,99 € *
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This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book. Backcover Would you like to use a consistent visual notation for drawing integration solutions? Look inside the front cover. Do you want to harness the power of asynchronous systems without getting caught in the pitfalls? See Thinking Asynchronously in the Introduction. Do you want to know which style of application integration is best for your purposes? See Chapter 2, Integration Styles. Do you want to learn techniques for processing messages concurrently? See Chapter 10, Competing Consumers and Message Dispatcher. Do you want to learn how you can track asynchronous messages as they flow across distributed systems? See Chapter 11, Message History and Message Store. Do you want to understand how a system designed using integration patterns can be implemented using Java Web services, .NET message queuing, and a TIBCO-based publish-subscribe architecture? See Chapter 9, Interlude: Composed Messaging. Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf show how asynchronous messaging has proven to be the best strategy for enterprise integration success. However, building and deploying messaging solutions presents a number of problems for developers. Enterprise Integration Patterns provides an invaluable catalog of sixty-five patterns, with real-world solutions that demonstrate the formidable of messaging and help you to design effective messaging solutions for your enterprise. The authors also include examples covering a variety of different integration technologies, such as JMS, MSMQ, TIBCO ActiveEnterprise, Microsoft BizTalk, SOAP, and XSL. A case study describing a bond trading system illustrates the patterns in practice, and the book offers a look at emerging standards, as well as insights into what the future of enterprise integration might hold. This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book. 0321200683B09122003 Foreword by John Crupi. Foreword by Martin Fowler. Preface. Acknowledgments. Introduction. 1. Solving Integration Problems Using Patterns. The Need for Integration. Integration Challenges. How Integration Patterns Can Help. The Wide World of Integration. Loose Coupling. One-Minute EAI. A Loosely Coupled Integration Solution. Widgets & Gadgets 'R Us: An Example. Summary. 2. Integration Styles. Introduction. File Transfer (by Martin Fowler). Shared Database (by Martin Fowler). Remote Procedure Invocation (by Martin Fowler). Messaging. 3. Messaging Systems. Introduction. Message Channel. Message. Pipes and Filters. Message Router. Message Translator. Message Endpoint. 4. Messaging Channels. Introduction. Point-to-Point Channel. Publish-Subscribe Channel. Datatype Channel. Invalid Message Channel. Dead Letter Channel. Guaranteed Delivery. Channel Adapter. Messaging Bridge. Message Bus. 5. Message Construction. Introduction. Command Message. Document Message. Event Message. Request-Reply. Return Address. Correlation Identifier. Message Sequence. Message Expiration. Format Indicator. 6. Interlude: Simple Messaging. Introduction. JMS Request-Reply Example. .NET Request-Reply Example. JMS Publish-Subscribe Example. 7. Message Routing. Introduction. Content-Based Router. Message Filter. Dynamic Router. Recipient List. Splitter. Aggregator. Resequencer. Composed Message Processor. Scatter-Gather. Routing Slip. Process Manager. Message Broker. 8. Message Transformation. Introduction. Envelope Wrapper. Content Enricher. Content Filter. Claim Check. Normalizer. Canonical Data Model. 9. Interlude: Composed Messaging. Loan Broker Example. Synchronous Implementation Using Web Services (by Conrad F. D'Cruz). Asynchronous Implementation with MSMQ. Asynchronous Implementation with TIBCO ActiveEnterprise (by Michael J. Rettig). 10. Messaging Endpoints. Introduction. Messaging Gateway. Messaging Mapper. Transactional Client. Polling Consumer. Event-Driven Consumer. Competing Consumers. Message Dispatcher. Selective Consumer. Durable Subscriber. Idempotent Receiver. Service Activator. 11. System Management. Introduction. Control Bus. Detour. Wire Tap. Message History. Message Store. Smart Proxy. Test Message. Channel Purger. 12. Interlude: System Management Example. Loan Broker System Management. 13. Integration Patterns in Practice. Case Study: Bond Pricing System (by Jonathan Simon). 14. Concluding Remarks. Emerging Standards and Futures in Enterprise Integration (by Sean Neville). Bibliography. Index. 0321200683T10062003Would you like to use a consistent visual notation for drawing integration solutions? Look inside the front cover. Do you want to harness the power of asynchronous systems without getting caught in the pitfalls? See Thinking Asynchronously in the Introduction. Do you want to know which style of application integration is best for your purposes? See Chapter 2, Integration Styles. Do you want to learn techniques for processing messages concurrently? See Chapter 10, Competing Consumers and Message Dispatcher. Do you want to learn how you can track asynchronous messages as they flow across distributed systems? See Chapter 11, Message History and Message Store. Do you want to understand how a system designed using integration patterns can be implemented using Java Web services, .NET message queuing, and a TIBCO-based publish-subscribe architecture? See Chapter 9, Interlude: Composed Messaging. Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf show how asynchronous messaging has proven to be the best strategy for enterprise integration success. However, building and deploying messaging solutions presents a number of problems for developers. Enterprise Integration Patterns provides an invaluable catalog of sixty-five patterns, with real-world solutions that demonstrate the formidable of messaging and help you to design effective messaging solutions for your enterprise.The authors also include examples covering a variety of different integration technologies, such as JMS, MSMQ, TIBCO ActiveEnterprise, Microsoft BizTalk, SOAP, and XSL. A case study describing a bond trading system illustrates the patterns in practice, and the book offers a look at emerging standards, as well as insights into what the future of enterprise integration might hold.This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book.0321200683B09122003

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 22.10.2020
Zum Angebot
Enterprise Integration Patterns
44,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book. Backcover Would you like to use a consistent visual notation for drawing integration solutions? Look inside the front cover. Do you want to harness the power of asynchronous systems without getting caught in the pitfalls? See Thinking Asynchronously in the Introduction. Do you want to know which style of application integration is best for your purposes? See Chapter 2, Integration Styles. Do you want to learn techniques for processing messages concurrently? See Chapter 10, Competing Consumers and Message Dispatcher. Do you want to learn how you can track asynchronous messages as they flow across distributed systems? See Chapter 11, Message History and Message Store. Do you want to understand how a system designed using integration patterns can be implemented using Java Web services, .NET message queuing, and a TIBCO-based publish-subscribe architecture? See Chapter 9, Interlude: Composed Messaging. Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf show how asynchronous messaging has proven to be the best strategy for enterprise integration success. However, building and deploying messaging solutions presents a number of problems for developers. Enterprise Integration Patterns provides an invaluable catalog of sixty-five patterns, with real-world solutions that demonstrate the formidable of messaging and help you to design effective messaging solutions for your enterprise. The authors also include examples covering a variety of different integration technologies, such as JMS, MSMQ, TIBCO ActiveEnterprise, Microsoft BizTalk, SOAP, and XSL. A case study describing a bond trading system illustrates the patterns in practice, and the book offers a look at emerging standards, as well as insights into what the future of enterprise integration might hold. This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book. 0321200683B09122003 Foreword by John Crupi. Foreword by Martin Fowler. Preface. Acknowledgments. Introduction. 1. Solving Integration Problems Using Patterns. The Need for Integration. Integration Challenges. How Integration Patterns Can Help. The Wide World of Integration. Loose Coupling. One-Minute EAI. A Loosely Coupled Integration Solution. Widgets & Gadgets 'R Us: An Example. Summary. 2. Integration Styles. Introduction. File Transfer (by Martin Fowler). Shared Database (by Martin Fowler). Remote Procedure Invocation (by Martin Fowler). Messaging. 3. Messaging Systems. Introduction. Message Channel. Message. Pipes and Filters. Message Router. Message Translator. Message Endpoint. 4. Messaging Channels. Introduction. Point-to-Point Channel. Publish-Subscribe Channel. Datatype Channel. Invalid Message Channel. Dead Letter Channel. Guaranteed Delivery. Channel Adapter. Messaging Bridge. Message Bus. 5. Message Construction. Introduction. Command Message. Document Message. Event Message. Request-Reply. Return Address. Correlation Identifier. Message Sequence. Message Expiration. Format Indicator. 6. Interlude: Simple Messaging. Introduction. JMS Request-Reply Example. .NET Request-Reply Example. JMS Publish-Subscribe Example. 7. Message Routing. Introduction. Content-Based Router. Message Filter. Dynamic Router. Recipient List. Splitter. Aggregator. Resequencer. Composed Message Processor. Scatter-Gather. Routing Slip. Process Manager. Message Broker. 8. Message Transformation. Introduction. Envelope Wrapper. Content Enricher. Content Filter. Claim Check. Normalizer. Canonical Data Model. 9. Interlude: Composed Messaging. Loan Broker Example. Synchronous Implementation Using Web Services (by Conrad F. D'Cruz). Asynchronous Implementation with MSMQ. Asynchronous Implementation with TIBCO ActiveEnterprise (by Michael J. Rettig). 10. Messaging Endpoints. Introduction. Messaging Gateway. Messaging Mapper. Transactional Client. Polling Consumer. Event-Driven Consumer. Competing Consumers. Message Dispatcher. Selective Consumer. Durable Subscriber. Idempotent Receiver. Service Activator. 11. System Management. Introduction. Control Bus. Detour. Wire Tap. Message History. Message Store. Smart Proxy. Test Message. Channel Purger. 12. Interlude: System Management Example. Loan Broker System Management. 13. Integration Patterns in Practice. Case Study: Bond Pricing System (by Jonathan Simon). 14. Concluding Remarks. Emerging Standards and Futures in Enterprise Integration (by Sean Neville). Bibliography. Index. 0321200683T10062003Would you like to use a consistent visual notation for drawing integration solutions? Look inside the front cover. Do you want to harness the power of asynchronous systems without getting caught in the pitfalls? See Thinking Asynchronously in the Introduction. Do you want to know which style of application integration is best for your purposes? See Chapter 2, Integration Styles. Do you want to learn techniques for processing messages concurrently? See Chapter 10, Competing Consumers and Message Dispatcher. Do you want to learn how you can track asynchronous messages as they flow across distributed systems? See Chapter 11, Message History and Message Store. Do you want to understand how a system designed using integration patterns can be implemented using Java Web services, .NET message queuing, and a TIBCO-based publish-subscribe architecture? See Chapter 9, Interlude: Composed Messaging. Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf show how asynchronous messaging has proven to be the best strategy for enterprise integration success. However, building and deploying messaging solutions presents a number of problems for developers. Enterprise Integration Patterns provides an invaluable catalog of sixty-five patterns, with real-world solutions that demonstrate the formidable of messaging and help you to design effective messaging solutions for your enterprise.The authors also include examples covering a variety of different integration technologies, such as JMS, MSMQ, TIBCO ActiveEnterprise, Microsoft BizTalk, SOAP, and XSL. A case study describing a bond trading system illustrates the patterns in practice, and the book offers a look at emerging standards, as well as insights into what the future of enterprise integration might hold.This book provides a consistent vocabulary and visual notation framework to describe large-scale integration solutions across many technologies. It also explores in detail the advantages and limitations of asynchronous messaging architectures. The authors present practical advice on designing code that connects an application to a messaging system, and provide extensive information to help you determine when to send a message, how to route it to the proper destination, and how to monitor the health of a messaging system. If you want to know how to manage, monitor, and maintain a messaging system once it is in use, get this book.0321200683B09122003

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 22.10.2020
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Full Data Controlled Web Based Feed Aggregator
49,00 € *
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Web feed syndication is analogous to electronic newsletters, both are aimed at delivering feeds to subscribers, the difference is that while newsletter subscription requires e-mail and exposed users to spam and several security challenges, feed syndication ensures that subscribers get only what they requested for. This research investigate the state of the art of web feed aggregation technology and the development of a locally hosted or intranet based feed aggregator as a tool for getting news update, research, information sharing, rapid alert, product promotion and advertising using the core features of WordPress, the software was further enhanced with plugins and widgets for user management, dynamic content publishing, database and object caching, social web syndication, mobile device detection, back-up and maintenance. The results highlight the current developments in software re-use and describes, how open source content management systems can be used for both online and offline publishing, a means whereby feed aggregator users can control and share feed data, as well as how web developers can focus on extending built-in software libraries rather than re-inventing the wheel.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 22.10.2020
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Web Feed
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! A web feed (or news feed) is a data format used for providing users with frequently updated content. Content distributors syndicate a web feed, thereby allowing users to subscribe to it. Making a collection of web feeds accessible in one spot is known as aggregation, which is performed by an aggregator. A web feed is also sometimes referred to as a syndicated feed. A typical scenario of web feed use is: a content provider publishes a feed link on their site which end users can register with an aggregator program (also called a feed reader or a news reader) running on their own machines, doing this is usually as simple as dragging the link from the web browser to the aggregator. When instructed, the aggregator asks all the servers in its feed list if they have new content, if so, the aggregator either makes a note of the new content or downloads it. Aggregators can be scheduled to check for new content periodically. Web feeds are an example of pull technology, although they may appear to push content to the user.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 22.10.2020
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Performance Optimization of Web Based RSS Aggre...
49,00 € *
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RSS is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works and delivers its information as an XML file called an RSS feed. RSS feeds can be read using software called "aggregator", which can be web-based and desktop-based. Web Based RSS Aggregator is a popular service which surpasses the need of desktop RSS Aggregator. It is a highly dynamic web service. Dynamic web services need high performance and customer satisfaction maintaining large data sets. A solemn competition is running between the web service providers. This thesis paper focused to optimize the performance challenges faced by a Web based RSS Aggregator company pageflakes which already become first in this arena beating Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo etc. In our work, different Web Based RSS Aggregators have been investigated and their features and architecture have been compared to get a clear perception of their services and existing challenges. Some existing technologies of web services have been examined and ways to effectively using those have been proposed. The proposal was implemented in smaller scale and effectiveness of those has been proved statistically.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 22.10.2020
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Secure Data Aggregation in WSN
34,00 € *
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Typically, there are three types of nodes in WSN: normal sensor nodes, aggregators, and a querier. The aggregators collect data from a subset of the network, aggregate the data using a suitable aggregation function and then transmit the aggregated result to an upper aggregator or to the querier who generates the query. The querier is entrusted with the task of processing the received sensor data and derives meaningful information reflecting the events in the target field.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 22.10.2020
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